Mice – Toddler Storytime

I know that cats usually follow mice, but I decided to do things the other way around for this storytime session.

MOVEMENT: Welcome Song*

MOVEMENT: “Clap Your Hands, Clap Your Hands” from Tickles and Tunes by Kathy Reid-Naiman

MOVEMENT: Open Shut Them*

INTRODUCTION: with Mouse Puppet from Folkmanis

My friend this time was my brown mouse puppet.  I had him come out and be shy to the audience (really, this is the only puppet-y thing I know how to do.)  Then I pretended I didn’t know what he was and we went over his features together: 2 ears (where are your ears?), a little nose (show me your nose!), etc until they told me he was a mouse!

BOOK:

Mice
 by Rose Fyleman, illustrated by Lois Ehlert

MOVEMENT: “Roll Your Hands” from Toddlers on Parade by Carol Hammett and Elaine Bueffel

MOVEMENT: Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

COUNTING SONG:*
10MiceFlannelboardcroppedwithlogo
10 Mice

FLANNELBOARD:
Little Mouse, Little Mouse
LittleMouseFlannelboard1CroppedwithLogoLittleMouseFlannelboard2CroppedwithLogo (Pattern & Rhyme from Felt Board Fingerplays by Liz & Dick Wilmes)

Little mouse, little mouse
Are you in the (insert color here) house?

I know I use this rhyme a lot, but it is one of my favorites.  I like hiding other animals in the different houses so that it is a surprise when things are uncovered. The ones picture above are from some of my ArtFelt sets.  I also like to leave one house empty with “nobody home”.

MOVEMENT: “Row, Row, Row Your Boat” from Songs for Wiggleworms by the Old Town School of Folk Music

MOVEMENT: Itsy Bitsy Spider

BOOK:

Thank You Bear
 by Greg Foley

MOVEMENT: “Two Little Blackbirds” from Fingerplays and Footplays by Rosemary Hallum and Henry “Buzz” Glass

VIDEO:

“Playground” from Play Time Maisy

MOVEMENT:  Storytime’s Over*

ADDITIONAL MATERIAL IDEAS:

Book: Mouse’s Birthday by Jane Yolen illustrated by Bruce Degen
Book: Pip & Squeak by Ian Schoenherr
Book: Mouse Mess by Linnea Riley
Book: Lunch by Denise Fleming

HOW IT WENT:
This was a fairly good storytime.  I am finding that the puppets seems to be a good way of kicking off the show.  I don’t know if I will have puppets for all my different storytime themes, but so far it works alright.  Mice was a great book to read.  At the 10 am storytime, I didn’t do a very good job of emphasizing who it was that liked mice, so I made sure at the 11 am storytime to point that out.  It was fun, and I think the colors carry very well.  The groups were having trouble sitting still towards the end of storytime, so I shorted Thank You Bear by skipping a few of the pages.  It worked just fine.

I originally meant to show the Dancing episode of Maisy – after the short episode the song was “The Wheels on the Bus” and I thought that might appease the heckler from last week.  However, I didn’t cue the DVD correctly, so we watched Playground instead.  Since the kid didn’t have a breakdown about “The Wheels on the Bus” I’m thinking we’re good.

ATTENDANCE:  10 am:  44 people      11 am: 44 people

* For these songs, please see my Storytime Movements & Music page

Mice – Infant Storytime

If you are going to do a cat storytime, it seems only fair to follow that up with a mice storytime!  So today, we celebrated the many ways that mice are nice.

MOVEMENT: Welcome Song*

MOVEMENT: Peek-a-Boo*

BOUNCE: Roly Poly*

PARENT TIP: Rhymes with movement, like Roly Poly and other bounces, strengthen your child’s body and helps them develop control.
(taken from The Early Literacy Kit: A Handbook and Tip Cards by Etsy Diamant-Cohen and Saroj Nadkarni Ghoting.  Available at the ALA Store)

BOOK:

Lunch by Denise Fleming

MOVEMENT: “Clap, Tap and Bend” from It’s Toddler Time by Carol Hammett and Elaine Bueffel

FLANNELBOARD:
Little Mouse, Little Mouse
LittleMouseFlannelboard1CroppedwithLogoLittleMouseFlannelboard2CroppedwithLogo (Pattern & Rhyme from Felt Board Fingerplays by Liz & Dick Wilmes)

Little mouse, little mouse
Are you in the (insert color here) house?

I know I use this rhyme a lot, but it is one of my favorites.  When using it with the infants, I put fewer houses up on the flannelboard so it doesn’t take as much time.  I like hiding other animals in the different houses so that it is a surprise when things are uncovered. The ones picture above are from some of my ArtFelt sets.  I also like to leave one house empty with “nobody home”.

BOUNCE: “Ladies Ride” from Wiggleworms Love You by Old Town School of Folk Music

BOOK:
I
When the Elephant Walks
 by Keiko Kasza

NURSERY RHYME FLANNELBOARD:
Hickory Dickory Dock
HickoryDickoryFlannelboardCroppedwithLogo
(Template and Rhyme from Mother Goose’s Playhouse by Judy Sierra)

Hickory Dickory Dock,
The mouse ran up the clock.
The clock struck one,
The mouse ran down.
Hickory Dickory Dock.

MOVEMENT: “Itsy Bitsy Spider” from Children’s Favorite Songs Volume 3 from Walt Disney

MOVEMENT: “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star” from Songs for Wiggleworms by the Old Town School of Folk Music

MOVEMENT: Storytime’s Over*

ADDITIONAL MATERIAL IDEAS:
 
Book: Mice Squeak, We Speak by Tomie DePaola

HOW IT WENT:
This was a good storytime.  I only realized now, when writing it up, that I had forgotten to do our tickle rhyme during this storytime!  That was ok, though, because we had someone from Head Start come to talk about the early programs that they offer.  It made up for that time.

I am going to try to work in some more parent patter/parent tips during my infant toddler storytimes.  I got this one from a great book and cards set from ALA.  It’s super helpful and easy to use, and gives lots of great parent tips along with an activity for each of them.  I always feel slightly uncomfortable with parent tips, because who am I to tell a parent what they should be doing, especially since I do not have children myself.  But I need to accept that I do have knowledge they may not (especially when it comes to early literacy practices), and that it is perfectly appropriate to share that knowledge with them.

ATTENDANCE: 47 people

* For these songs, please see my page Storytime Movements & Music

Cats – Toddler Storytime

Meow Meow!  I thought we would start this session out with cat stories.

MOVEMENT: Welcome Song*

MOVEMENT: “Clap Your Hands, Clap Your Hands” from Tickles and Tunes by Kathy Reid-Naiman

MOVEMENT: Open Shut Them*

INTRODUCTION: with Cat Hand Puppet from ArtFelt
CatPuppetcropped
I mentioned that I brought a friend along, then had the kitty wave to the kids, and the kids wave back.  I’m not super comfortable with puppets, but I’m trying!

BOOK:

Mama Cat has Three Kittens
 by Denise Fleming

MOVEMENT: “Roll Your Hands” from Toddlers on Parade by Carol Hammett and Elaine Bueffel

MOVEMENT: Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

COUNTING SONG:*
10CatsFeltboardwithlogo
10 Cats

FLANNELBOARD:
5 Kittens in the Bed
5KittensintheBedFeltboardwithlogo
(rhyme and pattern from page 116 of a book that I do not have the title of!  This flannelboard was one of my mom’s, colored by my dad, so I don’t know where it’s from)

(Adapted from “Ten in the Bed”)
There were five kittens in the bed,
And the little one said, “It’s crowded.  Roll over.”
So they all rolled over, and one fell out;

There were four kittens in the bed…
There were three kittens in the bed…
There were two kittens in the bed…

There was one kitten in the bed,
And the little one said, “I’m lonely.”

So they all got back in the bed,
And the little one said, “Good night!”

MOVEMENT: “Row, Row, Row Your Boat” from Songs for Wiggleworms by the Old Town School of Folk Music

MOVEMENT: Itsy Bitsy Spider

BOOK:

Thumpy Feet by Betsy Lewin

MOVEMENT: “Two Little Blackbirds” from Fingerplays and Footplays by Rosemary Hallum and Henry “Buzz” Glass

VIDEO:

“The Truth About Puppies and Kittens” from The Poky Little Puppy and Friends

MOVEMENT:  Storytime’s Over*

ADDITIONAL MATERIAL IDEAS:

Book: What Will Fat Cat Sit On? by Jan Thomas
Book: I See Kitty by Yasmine Surovec
Book: Where is Tippy Toes? by Betsy Lewin
Book: Meeow and the Pots and Pans by Sebastien Braun (or any Meeow book)

HOW IT WENT:
Every time I finish one session of infant toddler storytime I think, “I am going to find some new music to use with this group!”  And then the weeks go by, and I think about it, but I have so much other stuff that I am working on that I forget about it, then before you know it, it’s time to start storytime again.  So, while I didn’t revamp all my songs, I did decide to try out a new opener — and I think this one is going to work well.  (Which isn’t surprising.  All Kathy Reid-Naiman’s stuff is great.)  Also, Thumpy Feet worked really well with the toddler group. Before I began the story I told the group that we were going to pretend to be cats, and do the same things that Thumpy did.  Interactive fun!  The video wasn’t my favorite, but I wanted something rather short since it was the first storytime of the session and the kids are not used to sitting for so long.

EDITED TO ADD:  I had forgotten about this until I was writing my outline for the next storytime, but I did have a child upset because we didn’t do the Wheels on the Bus.  My fabulous colleague, Marie, who did the Summer session of infant toddler storytime would do that as a regular song with the kids, I think.  This kid really wanted to do the Wheels on the Bus on the Screen that we use for our films.  What do you do when your rotate storytellers?  Do you try to incorporate things that others do to provide continuity?  Or do you each do your own thing?  I felt kind of bad because he looked like I was breaking his heart.

ATTENDANCE:  10 am:  48 people      11 am: 51 people

* For these songs, please see my Storytime Movements & Music page

Cats – Infant Storytime

I had so much fun at our cat eStorytime that I decided to continue with the theme for the beginning of our fall infant toddler storytime session.   Plus, I can’t believe it has been so long since I did a cat storytime for this age group!

MOVEMENT: Welcome Song*

MOVEMENT: Peek-a-Boo*

BOUNCE: Roly Poly*

BOOK:

Sleepy Kittens
 by Jill and Martin Leman

MOVEMENT: “Clap, Tap and Bend” from It’s Toddler Time by Carol Hammett and Elaine Bueffel

FLANNELBOARD:
Five Kittens in the Bed
5KittensintheBedFeltboardwithlogo
(rhyme and pattern from page 116 of a book that I do not have the title of!  This flannelboard was one of my mom’s, colored by my dad, so I don’t know where it’s from)

(Adapted from “Ten in the Bed”)
There were five kittens in the bed,
And the little one said, “It’s crowded.  Roll over.”
So they all rolled over, and one fell out;

There were four kittens in the bed…
There were three kittens in the bed…
There were two kittens in the bed…

There was one kitten in the bed,
And the little one said, “I’m lonely.”

So they all got back in the bed,
And the little one said, “Good night!”

BOUNCE: “Ladies Ride” from Wiggleworms Love You by Old Town School of Folk Music

BOOK:

I Love Cats
 by Barney Saltzberg

NURSERY RHYME FLANNELBOARD:
Hey Diddle Diddle
HeyDiddleDiddleFeltboardcropped
Flannelboard from Little Folk Visuals

Hey Diddle Diddle, the cat and the fiddle.
The cow jumped over the moon.
The little dog laughed, to see such a sight.
And the dish ran away with the spoon.

TICKLE: Round and Round the Garden*

MOVEMENT: “Itsy Bitsy Spider” from Children’s Favorite Songs Volume 3 from Walt Disney

MOVEMENT: “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star” from Songs for Wiggleworms by the Old Town School of Folk Music

MOVEMENT: Storytime’s Over*

ADDITIONAL MATERIAL IDEAS:
 
Meeow and the Pots and Pans by Sebastien Braun (or any Meeow book)
Brownie and Pearl Hit the Hay by Cynthia Rylant, pictures by Brian Biggs (or any Brownie & Pearl book)

HOW IT WENT:
Although I presented this storytime just yesterday, it feels like forever ago.  I forget how tiring our 3 back-to-back infant-toddler-toddler storytime days are.

ATTENDANCE: 50 people

* For these songs, please see my page Storytime Movements & Music

The Digital Shift: Appvisory in the Children’s Library

Last week I presented at my first conference, The Digital Shift, presented by Library Journal and School Library Journal.  A co-worker and I spoke about our recent project using iPads with children’s programming in the library.  If you listened to that — thanks so much!  And if not, it’s not too late do see our presentation.

School Library Journal just posted this wonderful recap and from that page you can also still register to see all our presentation.  Take a  look — I hope you find it useful!

And I’m still flipping out a little that we were featured on SLJ’s landing site:
2014-10-09 on the SLJ Landing Page

Cats – eStorytime

Today was my second-ever eStorytime!  I learned a lot from the first one, so this one went a lot more smoothly.  Sometimes you just have try something out and learn from your mistakes.

Opening Slide on Keynote:
Slide1 edited
I discovered that Keynote can do the exact thing that I was using Slide Shark to do last month.  I just emailed a copy of my PowerPoint slides to myself, and then opened them using Keynote.  Right now it is still easier for me to use PowerPoint on my work computer to get everything figured out, but maybe in the future I will just create things directly in Keynote.  I also created more slides this time for the slide show, because I wanted to make sure I didn’t have dead air time on the screen where the AppleTV settings came up, or worse the screen saver.  (The screen saver we had last time was set to cute animals.  No one pays attention to a book being read when there are cute animals on the screen.)

APP:
Free Animal Sounds - LionFree Animal Sounds - JaguarFree Animal Sounds CougarFree Animal Sounds - Cat]
Free Animal Sounds by Hakim Boukhatem (iOS: Free)
Before I announced the storytime theme for today, I said we were going to play a game. I turned off the mirroring element of the iPad, and held the iPad it towards me, then played the animal sound of a lion.  I had the kids try to guess what made that sound.  Then I turned the iPad around to show them the picture.  I did this for these four different animals, then asked what they had in common — they were all cats!.  Some of the sounds can be a little scary, so you may want to test them out before doing with really little ones.  And it’s harder to guess a real animal noise than you might think!  While I wish this app didn’t have banner advertising along the bottom, I do like it because it has large enough pictures that an audience can see on the iPad screen itself.  I also like that the sound is the only thing that plays — not the animal’s name, thus making a game like this possible.

APP:
Present For Milo Screenshot

A Present for Milo.  Written and Illustrated by Mike Austin.  from Ruckus Mobile Media. (iOS: $2.99)
In this delightful book app Milo the cat and mouse are having a fun chase around the house.  I just wish there was an option to turn off the narration of the story, but still retain the sound effects.  Since, as of this writing, there isn’t, I just muted the iPad and read the story at my own pace.  This worked perfectly.  There are lots of places to click to find more mice hiding throughout the story, and many interactive elements.  Since you can only use one interactive element at a time, they do sometimes feel slow to load.

FINGERPLAY:
Slide4 edited
“Ten Little Kittens”
(I don’t know where I got this rhyme from, it’s been so long. Forgive me for not giving credit.)

APP:
Sago Mini IntroSago Mini Pet Cafe LandingSago Mini Pet Cafe Cat Game
Sago Mini Pet Cafe by Sago Mini (iOS: $2.99)
Such a fun app!  For this, we entered the Pet Cafe then, since we were having a storytime about cats, we tapped on the Cat game. I had children count up the pieces of toast as I added them to the plate, then we figured out who wanted to eat them together.  Since I only had 3 kids in the group this time, I also walked up to each of the kids with the iPad and let them move the toast to who should eat it.  Fun!

MOVEMENT:
Slide4
“Jump Up, Turn Around” by Jim Gill from Jim Gill’s Sings Moving Rhymes for Modern Times

PRINT BOOK:

Kitten’s First Full Moon by Kevin Henkes

APP:
Cat Noises Feltboard editedGreat Big Cat Felt Board edited

Felt Board by Software Smoothie (iOS: $2.99)

On the Felt Board App, we did two different activities.

First, I had a few different cats set up, and then we made the sounds for each cat:
The tiny little kittens go mew, mew, mew
The tom cat goes Meow
The cat with the fiddle goes Fiddle Fiddle Fiddle
And the big jungle cat goes ROAR.

Next, I had a scene set up with a house, a large cat, and a tiny mouse and we did the following rhyme:

GREAT BIG CAT and TEENY LITTLE MOUSE
There was a GREAT BIG CAT
(Say “great big cat” in a big voice, make one hand be the cat)
and a TEENY LITTLE MOUSE
(Say “teeny little mouse” in a small squeaky voice, have other hand be small mouse)
Who ran around and around (Roll cat and mouse around each other)
in a tall, tall house! (Stretch arms above head)
Until that TEENY LITTLE MOUSE (Say “teeny little mouse” in a small squeaky voice)
got caught at last (Have cat catch mouse)
Because that GREAT BIG CAT (Say the “great big cat” in a big voice)
ran around so fast! (Roll cat and mouse around each other real fast)
(Rhyme from ArtFelt.  They also have an amazing puppet set to go with it.)

APP:
Bean's Night TitleBean's Night Page
Bean’s Night.  Words by Sarah Hines Stephens, Picture by Anna Grossnickle Hines. from appropos. (iOS, Android, Nook $1.99)
All of the Bean apps from appropos are great for storytime.  You have the option of turning the narration off, yet the fun sound effects still remain.  They are based on board books, so the text is quite limited, but the story was so charming that the 3-5 year olds seemed just fine with it.

APPS WE SHARED SLIDE:
Slide9 edited

MOVEMENT: Storytime’s Over*

ADDITIONAL MATERIAL IDEAS:

APP: Bean’s Baby from appropos (iOS, Android: FREE)
APP: Bean’s Games from appropos (iOS, Android: $1.99)
APP: Scruffy Kitty from wingedchariot (iOS: $4.99)  I like this app, I just wish there was an option to turn off the narration!

THOUGHTS ON THIS eSTORYTIME:

Technology-wise, this eStorytime went much better than my first.  Taking my own suggestion, I asked our technology guy to sit in on this one, just to make sure everything was running fine.  And of course, nothing went wrong, probably because he was there.  But, I’ll take that!  I also realized that turning off iPad’s sleep mode and requiring a login upon starting was probably a good idea.  Oh!  And during a practice session I realized it’s also a good idea to turn off all notifications for the iPad — don’t want any Facebook messages popping up during storytime.  Of course, this all could be avoided if I used the professional iPad instead of my own personal one, but I like the ease of being able to practice with my own whenever I want, and adding new apps as I find them.

Also learning from last time, I put a slide of the cover of Kitten’s First Full Moon up on the screen behind it while I read the story — no adorably cute animal screen-savers this time.  At the end of storytime, our tech guy let me know there was actually a button on the projector that lets you set the screen to blank, without fully turning off the projector.  I think I will try this next time.  There’s also a button for blank screen and muted sound.  So helpful to know, and I wouldn’t have found it on my own.

We had a much smaller group of people at this one — only 6 people.  I think we ran out of flyers.  Must print some more.

Here’s looking forward to next month!

ATTENDANCE: 6 people (children and adults)

*To see the words to these movements and activities I use frequently, please visit my A-capella Movements Section on my Storytime Movements and Music Page

All app prices were correct at the time of writing this blog, but may have changed since.

Mammoths and Ice Age – Preschool Storytime

I noticed that there seemed to be quite a few new books about mammoths out, which inspired today’s Ice Age theme.  Also, it may have something to do with the fact that today’s high is 102° and I am longing for cooler weather.   While this may seem like a strange theme for preschool storytime, it was actually really successful!

MOVEMENT: Welcome Song*

BOOK:

How to Wash a Woolly Mammoth
by Michelle Robinson, illustrated by Kate Hindley

MOVEMENT:  The Mastodon
(With a quick name changes this Elephant fingerplay is now about an ice age mammal.)

The mastodon goes like this and that (walk heavily from side to side).
He’s terribly big (hold hands out to side)
And he’s terrible fat (bring hands around to make circle around tummy).
He had no fingers (wiggle fingers).
He had no toes (wiggle toes).
But goodness gracious — what a nose! (Make a trunk with arm).

FLANNELBOARD:
The Mammoths in the Ice Age
Mammoths in the Ice Age Flannelboard2 blog labeled Mammoths in the Ice Age Flannelboard2-Labeled
(Templates from coloring pages from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science)

(to tune of: “The Wheels on the Bus”)
The mammoths in the Ice Age went
trumpet, trumpet, trumpet,
trumpet, trumpet, trumpet,
trumpet, trumpet, trumpet.
The mammoths in the ice age went
trumpet, trumpet, trumpet,
All around the land.

Other verses:
The saber tooth tiger in the Ice Age went growl, growl, growl…
The ground sloth in the Ice Age moved slow, slow, slow…
The camel in the Ice Age went spit, spit, spit…
The dire wolf in the Ice Age went howl, howl, howl…
The man in the Ice Age said big, big, big…

BOOK:

Me Hungry! by Jeremy Tankard

MOVEMENT: “Jump Up, Turn Around” from Jim Gill’s Irrational Anthem by Jim Gill

BOOK:

A Mammoth in the Fridge by Michaël Escoffier and illustrated by Matthieu Maudet.

VIDEO:

“Edwina, the Dinosaur Who Didn’t Know She Was Extinct” from Don’t Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late … and more stories by Mo Willems based on the book by Mo Willems

MOVEMENT: Storytime’s Over*

ADDITIONAL MATERIAL IDEAS:

Book: Me Want Pet! by Tammi Sauer, illustrated by Bob Shea
Book: Mammoth and Me by Algy Craig Hall
Book: Mammoths on the Move by Lisa Wheeler, illustrated by Kurt Cyrus
Book: Hot Hot Hot by Neal Layton

Rhyme: Mammoth Walk
(another adaptation of an elephant movement)
Right foot, left food, see me go (stomp on right foot first, then on left).
I am shaggy and big and slow.
I go walking down the ice.
With my trunk and tusks so nice. (make a trunk, then tusks with arms.)

THOUGHTS ON THIS STORYTIME:
My fiancé was teasing me about how this seemed to be a really specific storytime theme, and that he thought it was pretty weird.  I said if you had been doing storytime for almost 8 years you wanted some variety.  And it turned out to be a great storytime!  All listeners really seemed to enjoy How to Wash a Woolly Mammoth, as well as the rest of the books.  The flannelboard went better than I thought it would, considering this is one of the first ones I’ve developed from scratch.  And thanks to information from the La Brea Tar Pits Page Museum I found out that all these animals were found in those tar pits — which means they lived around here at one point!  Next time I do this storytime I think I will bring along some nonfiction to show pictures of what the animals looked like – I overheard a child ask what a mastodon was and it would have been nice to have something to show the kids.  I know the movie was a bit of a stretch for this theme, but we didn’t have any good preschool-aged movies to show.  So before showing the film I asked if any of the kids knew what extinct meant (DIED!), and explained how all the ice age animals we were talking about were extinct, and how the dinosaurs were extinct before these animals existed.  And then I played the movie, and no one really cared if it tied in with the theme because it’s a great story and they all enjoyed it anyway.

ATTENDANCE: 53 (adults and children – it was a mammoth-sized storytime)

*To see the words to these movements and activities I use frequently, please visit my A-capella Movements Section on my Storytime Movements and Music Page