Apples – Preschool Storytime

A few weeks ago I did an apple storytime, but I forgot to post it on here!  So, I figure better late than never.

September always makes me think of starting school (even though school starts here now in August!), and fall (even though it’s in the high 80s, mid 90s).  So how else could celebrate the first Saturday in September than with a storytime about apples, the most quintessential of fall fruits?

MOVEMENT: Welcome Song*

MOVEMENT: “Jump Jump” from I’m a Rock Star by Joanie Leeds and the Nightlights

BOOK:

Ouch!
by Ragnhild Scamell

Movement:
A Little Apple Seed
(to tune of “Itsy Bitsy Spider”)

Once a little apple seed
was planted in the ground.
Down came the raindrops falling all around.
Out came the big sun
Bright as bright could be
And that little apple seed grew up
to be an apple tree.

FLANNELBOARD:
A-P-P-L-E
A-P-P-L-E Flannelboard1

(to tune of “Bingo”)There is a fruit that’s good to eat
and apple is its name-o.
A-P-P-L-E
A-P-P-L-E
A-P-P-L-E
and apple is its name-o.

Now when we turn the apple over, and you don’t see a letter, you clap instead! (Do this one apple at a time — I just took this photo when two apples were turned over.)A-P-P-L-E Flannelboard2

There is a fruit that’s good to eat
and apple is its name-o.
clapclap-P-L-E
clapclap-P-L-E
clapclap-P-L-E
and apple is its name-o.

Continue singing  and clapping until all apples are turned over.
A-P-P-L-E Flannelboard3

MOVEMENT: “Shake My Sillies Out” from More Singable Songs for the Very Young by Raffi

FLANNELBOARD:
An Apple Tree
TheAppleTreeFlannelboard2
Way up high in the apple tree (lift hands above head)
Four red apples (hold up 4 fingers)
smiled at me (smile)
So I shook that tree as hard as I could (pretend to shake the tree)
And down came an apple.
Mmm… was it good! (rub tummy).

Continue with the rhyme until all apples have been eaten!

BOOK:

Apple Pie ABC by Alison Murray

VIDEO:

“Chicka Chicka 1 2 3” from Chicka Chicka 1 2 3  — and more stories about counting

MOVEMENT: Storytime’s Over*

ADDITIONAL MATERIAL IDEAS:

Book: A New House for Mouse by Petr Horácek
Book: Ten Red Apples by Pat Hutchins
Book: Little Apple Goat by Caroline Jayne Church
Book: Apple by Nikki McClure

THOUGHTS ON THIS STORYTIME:
Though we say this is a preschool storytime, we actually end up with a wide range of ages in the audience on any given Saturday.  I started out with the book Ouch! because that is one of my favorites – I love the illustrations, and the kids and the adults both seem to get a kick out of it.  However, with the group I had this Saturday, the story felt rather long.  That’s why for my second book I chose Apple Pie ABC – it’s still engaging, and the photos are wonderful, but it is a lot shorter and I hoped that would help with the concentration of the audience.  I think it worked.  Also, the video was a good one – again, slightly long, but since it is one the kids are familiar with I think that helps.  I swear I could hear a little voice singing along, but I couldn’t locate where it was coming from.

ATTENDANCE: 67!! (adults and children)

*To see the words to these movements and activities I use frequently, please visit my A-capella Movements Section on my Storytime Movements and Music Page

Bread and Butter – Preschool/Family Storytime

Since my Loafing Around program was a couple of weeks ago (things have been busy… sorry I haven’t updated!), I don’t remember the exact agenda I used for the storytime.  But I did want to record the books and flannelboards that I used here.

BOOKS:
 

FLANNELBOARDS:

The Little Red Hen
from: Sierra, Judy.  The Flannel Board Storytelling Book 2nd Edition. 1997. pg 152
Little Red Hen Flannelboard

A traditional retelling of the tale, but I changed the object being baked from cake to bread to fit in with the theme better.

Yellow Butter, Purple Jelly, Red Jam, and Brown Bread Tongue Twister
rhyme and template taken from Miss Mary Liberry (though I altered the pieces just a little)
Yellow Butter Flannelboard
Yellow butter
Purple jelly
Red jam
Brown Bread

Spread it thick, say it quick!
Spread it thicker, say it quicker!
Now repeat it, while you eat it!
Yum!

Fred Fed Ted Bread Tongue Twister
Inspired by Miss Mary Liberry, and since I thought I might have a wide range of ages at this program, I wanted to do something that would work for older children at the program too.  I found this tongue twister online and thought it would make a cute flannelboard.  I got the pattern for the man from “The Three Pigs” in Judy Sierra’s  The Flannel Board Storytelling Book 2nd Edition (pg 151) and just drew in the bread in his outstretched hand.

Bread Tonguetwister
Fred fed Ted bread and Ted fed Fred bread.
We tried a couple of times to say this, and then I asked for volunteers to try out loud.

Movement:

Bread and Butter
Clap and and slap thighs in rhythm to this chant

Bread and Butter
Marmalade and Jam
Let’s Say Hello
as __quietly__ as we can.
Hello
Other verses: loudly, slowly, fast, high and low.
(Taken from Preschool Storytime Outlines)

Peanut, Peanut Butter (and Jelly)
I added a couple of verses at the beginning of this song about kneading the dough, baking the bread, and slicing the bread.

ACTIVITY:
Making Butter! (See this post for instructions.)

ADDITIONAL MATERIAL IDEAS:

Book: What to Do? What to Do? by Toni Teevin
Book: Monsieur Saguette and His Baguette by Frank Asch
Book: Bread is for Eating by David and Phillis Gershator
Book: The Tortilla Factory by Gary Paulsen
Book: Loaves of Fun by Elizabeth M. Harbison

ATTENDANCE: 71 (adults and children)

*To see the words to these movements and activities I use frequently, please visit my A-capella Movements Section on my Storytime Movements and Music Page

Making Butter at Storytime!

Since we are doing the “Reading is Soooooo Delicious” theme for this summer, my library celebrated with a system-wide Fun Food Week.  Each branch chose a food-related program to highlight at their location.

My program was a bread storytime where we made our own butter!  I got the idea for this program because I remembered making it in preschool (kindergarten?  it was a long time ago…), and I thought it was so cool then.  Apparently, science still amazes now, because the program (that my coworker coined “Loafing Around”) was a hit with both kids and parents — some even wanted to go home and try making more butter.

And making it is really simple!

Make Your Own Butter

You need a jar with a lid that closes tightly and heavy whipping cream.
Jar and Cream

That’s it!

Pour the whipping cream into the jar.  Leave some room so the cream can move around. Of course, you can vary the amount depending on how much butter you want to make.
Butter7

Shake! Shake! Shake!
Butter8

After shaking for a little while, the cream will turn into whipped cream.  You won’t hear liquid sloshing around anymore.
Butter3 Butter2

Keep shaking more, and the mixture will look like it is turning back to liquid in your jar.  It’s actually becoming butter and buttermilk.  In the photo below, you can see the lump of butter in the center of the jar, and then buttermilk surrounding it.
Butter4

Pour off the buttermilk to separate it from the butter.  (At home I just poured it out of the jar, when I did the program at the library we dumped it out into a bucket covered with cheesecloth.  You can see that on the right.  Also, at the library, we scooped up the butter each child made and put it into a plastic take-out sauce container, and handed them a popsicle stick for spreading.)
Butter10 buttermilk

If you are making a lot of butter at home that you will want to enjoy for a while, rinse off the butter under cold water to get rid of the buttermilk — this will make the butter last longer.  At the library, since we were enjoying the butter right away and only made a small amount, we skipped this step.

Put your butter on bread, and enjoy! For the Loafing Around program we created sandwich baggies that had a small sample of various kinds of bread: tortilla, French bread, lavash, challah, Irish soda bread and pumpernickel.  Each kid received a baggie to go with the butter they made.
breads

TIPS IF YOU DO THIS AS A LIBRARY PROGRAM:

– WIDER MOUTH JARS WORK BETTER.
Jars like the one pictured with the cream in the first photo work better than narrow mouth jars (like the ones you see in the shaking photos).    It is easier to get the butter out from these, and it just seemed to work better overall.  (We got our jars from The Container Store.  The 4 oz ones worked best.)

– TEST THE JARS FIRST TO MAKE SURE THEY DON’T LEAK
Since we couldn’t get enough of the good 4oz jars, we used smaller 3 oz ones for the program, and they were not leak-proof.  To solve this problem, we just put the jar with the cream in it inside a sandwich baggie.  This helped keep our carpet clean and worked just fine.

– DON’T USE SPICE SHAKER INSERTS ON TOP OF THE JARS
Since we couldn’t find enough of the 4 oz jars, we went with 3 oz narrower jars that were meant for storing spices.  In addition to a twist on lid, these came with snap off inserts that had holes for shaking out spices.  I thought, “Oh this might be a great way to drain the buttermilk without having to take the butter out of the jar!”  BUT NO.  The cream didn’t like having the lid their during shaking, and the holes just ended up causing a problems instead of a solution.

– HAVE MORE THAN ONE BUTTERMILK DRAINING STATION
If you have all the children in the program start making butter at the same time, they will probably all be ready around the same time.  We had two draining stations to pour off the butter set up, and we probably could have used one more.

– HAVE SOMETHING TO PUT THE BUTTER IN SO KIDS CAN TAKE LEFTOVERS My coworker came up with the great idea to use take-out restaurant sauce containers with lids and they were perfect.  This way, we didn’t have to give away the more expensive jars to the kids, and we could save them to use at another program in the future.

– USE VOLUNTEERS TO HELP OUT
If I did this program again, I would get more people to help me out.  Volunteers could help with the draining of the buttermilk and putting the butter into the sauce containers.  They also would have been useful for clean-up afterwards.

– MAKE DIFFERENT FLAVORS WITH OLDER CHILDREN
If I was going to do this program with an older audience, I might add some different flavor elements that kids could use to make flavored butter: herbs like chives or dill, sugars, salt, etc.

But, even for doing it the first time around this was a really fun program, and it was a great success as well.  I would definitely do it again!

Berries – Preschool Storytime

Today is the first day of our Reading is Soooooo Delicious Summer Reading Club so we had to celebrate with a food themed storytime!

MOVEMENT: Welcome Song*

MOVEMENT: “Jump Jump” from I’m a Rock Star by Joanie Leeds and the Nightlights

BOOK:

Jamberry 
by Bruce Degen

Movement:
Pop! Goes the Berry
I took this idea from the ladies over at jbrary.  You can see their YouTube video of this song here.

(to tune of “Pop Goes the Weasel”)
Have children start the song crouching down.
All around the strawberry field
I picked some juicy berries (motion like you are picking berries from bushes)
Brought them home
And washed them off
Pop! Goes the berry. (have children pop up from crouch)

At the end of each verse ask the children to name different berries and then do the action over with that berry.

FLANNELBOARD:
Bear’s Feast
taken from page 7 of Ready-to-Go Storytimes: Fingerplays, Scripts, Patterns Music and More by Gail Benton and Trisha Waichulaitis.

BearsFeastFlannelboard1

Mama bear and Little Bear woke up hungry after their long winter’s nap.  They went to the stump where they usually ate.  “Mama,” asked Little Bear, “Where’s the food?”  Mama laughed.  “We have to go find it.”  she told Little Bear.  “Why don’t you see if you can find us some blueberries.”

So Little Bear set off and soon came back.  “Here Mama!” he said, placing his find on the tree stump.  “A berry!”  “Oh Little Bear, that’s not a berry!  That’s an… (pause here to wait for the children to answer) acorn!”
BearsFeastFlannelboard2

Continue the story this way with Little Bear continuing to bring back the wrong types of food, including a fish, an apple and an orange.
BearsFeastFlannelboard3

“Ok Mama, I’ll try one more time.”  said Little Bear.  And off he went again to find the berries.  Soon he came back and said, “Mama! Mama! Look what I found!”BearsFeastFlannelboard4

“DAD!”

BearsFeastFlannelboard5
“And he helped me find berries!”  So the whole Bear family sat and ate the giant feast of food that Little Bear had found.

MOVEMENT: “Shake My Sillies Out” from More Singable Songs for the Very Young by Raffi

FLANNELBOARD:
Five Red Strawberries
Taken from Mel’s Desk (Her’s are much more beautiful)
FiveRedStrawberriesFlannelbaord
Five red strawberries, sweet to the core.
Bear came and ate one and then there were four.

Four red strawberries, growing near a tree.
Bear came and ate one and then there were three.

Three red strawberries, for you and you and you.
Bear came and ate one and then there were two.

Two red strawberries, sitting in the sun.
Bear came and ate one and then there was one.

One red strawberry, left all alone.
Bear came and ate it and then there were none.

BOOK:

The Little Mouse, The Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear by Don and Audrey Wood

VIDEO:

“Grandma’s Berry Patch” from Max & Ruby: Berry Bunny Adventures

MOVEMENT: Storytime’s Over*

ADDITIONAL MATERIAL IDEAS:

Book: One Little Blueberry by Tammy Salzano
Book: Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush by Iza Trapani
Book: Blackberry Banquet by Terry Pierce
Video: “Blueberries for Sal” from Make Way for Ducklings … and Other Robert McCloskey Stories

THOUGHTS ON THIS STORYTIME:
Like the last preschool storytime I did, this one had a wider range of ages than usual.  All the kids responded really well to The Little Mouse…, young and old alike.  I think Jamberry works better with younger kids, but the older ones seemed to listen as well.  That book has such a great cadence for reading aloud.  All the listeners also had a good time with “Bear’s Feast”.  I’ll have to remember how well that one went over and use it again.
Since today was the beginning of our Summer Reading Club I thought it might be easier on the desk staff if I explained the program as a whole to everyone in storytime, instead of doing it individually at the desk.  After I finished the stories, but before the movie, I used an example bag to show everyone what the program was about.  Then I passed out registration cards during the movie that the parents (or children), could fill out.  All the patrons had to do them was go to the desk, hand in their card, and get their bag.  It worked fairly well that way.

ATTENDANCE: 27 (adults and children)

*To see the words to these movements and activities I use frequently, please visit my A-capella Movements Section on my Storytime Movements and Music Page

Let’s Eat – Toddler Storytime

Since Reading is Soooo Delicious this summer, I decided to finish up the Spring Storytime session with an eating theme!

MOVEMENT: Welcome Song*

MOVEMENT: “Clap Your Hands” from Wiggleworms Love You by Old Town School of Folk Music

MOVEMENT: Open Shut Them*

BOOK:

Tickle Tum
by Nancy Van Laan

MOVEMENT: “Roll Your Hands” from Toddlers on Parade by Carol Hammett and Elaine Bueffel

MOVEMENT: Itsy Bitsy Spider

COUNTING SONG:*
10 Ice Cream Scoops
Ice Cream Scoops

FLANNELBOARD:
Lunch
LunchFlannelboard
Based on the book by Denise Fleming, with inspiration from Roving Fiddlehead and LibrarianLindz.  I didn’t make a template for this one, just free-handed it.

I placed all the fruits and veggies on the board and had the kids name them.  Then I said I had a friend who was very hungry and brought out the mouse puppet.  I asked the kids to name the color of the food the mouse was eating.  Then after each thing he gobbled I asked the audience if they thought it was full yet.  After everything was finished being eaten, I made the mouse yawn and hid him behind the flannelboard.  I finished the way the book ends, “And then mouse took a nap until it was… Dinnertime!”

 

MOVEMENT: “Row, Row, Row Your Boat” from Songs for Wiggleworms by the Old Town School of Folk Music

BOOK:

Brownie and Pearl Grab a Bite by Cynthia Rylant

MOVEMENT: “Two Little Blackbirds” from Fingerplays and Footplays by Rosemary Hallum and Henry “Buzz” Glass

VIDEO:

“The Very Hungry Caterpillar” from The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Other Stories

MOVEMENT:  Storytime’s Over*

ADDITIONAL MATERIALS IDEAS:

Rah, Rah Radishes!
by April Pulley Sayre
One Little Spoonfulby Aliki
“Pigeon Finds a Hot Dog” DVD

HOW IT WENT:
I was surprised at how well Tickle Tum went over – the kids got strangely quite during that one.  I guess all the rhyming words sound fun.  I was pleasantly surprised with that one.  I liked counting Ice Cream Scoops, and the flannelboard was really fun with the puppet as well.

ATTENDANCE:  10 am:  35 people      11 am: 26 people

* For these songs, please see my Storytime Movements & Music page

Let’s Eat – Infant Storytime

Today at infant storytime we celebrated the joy of eating!

MOVEMENT: Welcome Song*

MOVEMENT: Peek-a-Boo*

BOUNCE: Icky Bicky Soda Cracker*
Ride a Little Pony*
In the Toaster*
The Grandfather Clock*

BOOK:

One Little Spoonful by Aliki

MOVEMENT: “Clap, Tap and Bend” from It’s Toddler Time by Carol Hammett and Elaine Bueffel

FLANNELBOARD:
Lunch
LunchFlannelboard

Based on the book by Denise Fleming, with inspiration from Roving Fiddlehead and LibrarianLindz.  I didn’t make a template for this one, just free-handed it.

I placed all the fruits and veggies on the board and had the kids name them.  Then I said I had a friend who was very hungry and brought out the mouse puppet.  I asked the kids to name the color of the food the mouse was eating.  Then after each thing he gobbled I asked the audience if they thought it was full yet.  After everything was finished being eaten, I finished the way the book ends, “And then mouse took a nap until it was… Dinnertime!”

BOUNCE: “Smooth Road to London Town” from A Smooth Road to London Town: Songs from the Parent-Child Mother Goose Program by Kathy Reid-Naiman

BOOK:

Brownie and Pearl Grab a Bite
by Cynthia Rylant

TICKLE: Round and Round the Garden*
Slowly Slowly Very Slowly Goes the Little Snail*
Chicken in the Barnyard*
These are Baby’s Fingers*

NURSERY RHYME:
This Little Piggy

This Little Piggy Flannelboard
I got this template from a co-worker a long time ago and have no idea where it was frum

MOVEMENT: “Itsy Bitsy Spider” from Children’s Favorite Songs Volume 3 from Walt Disney

MOVEMENT: “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star” from Songs for Wiggleworms by the Old Town School of Folk Music

MOVEMENT: Storytime’s Over*

ADDITIONAL MATERIAL IDEAS:

Spoonful by Benoit Marchon
Tickle Tum by Nancy Van Laan

HOW IT WENT:
This was the last storytime in my infant Spring Session.  It’s amazing how quickly ten weeks go by.  At the end of each session, I enjoy doing a refresher with all the bounces and tickles that we have done throughout the series, so parents can remember them and continue it at home.  Because we did all that I took out “Baby’s Little Self” from the routine.  I think One Little Spoonful worked really well with this age group because the parents can touch their babies where things are mentioned in the story.  I don’t know that the flannelboard was a very good one, I think it was better suited to older children.  Overall I think this storytime went pretty well, and I think the session as a whole was a good one too.  As always, I think I need to find some new songs/movements to use next time around.

ATTENDANCE: 29 people

* For these songs, please see my page Storytime Movements & Music

3rd Grade Storytime – Folktales and Food

Sorry I haven’t posted in a while — things have been rather busy here at work as the whole staff has shifted their work areas.  That, and I haven’t done a lot of storytimes in recent weeks.  But here I am, back with a recent class visit.

I do programming more frequently for the preschool and under set, and while I love working with school-aged children, I still find myself rather intimidated by them.  I’ve found that folktales are the perfect way to connect with these kids — and a great way to highlight what a great folktale collection we have!

BOOK:
LoveandRoastChickenbyKnutson
Love and Roast Chicken by Barbara Knutson

FLANNELBOARD:
The Three Wishes
ThreeWishesFlannelboard1 ThreeWishesFlannelboard2
Patterns and Story from  The Flannel Board Storytelling Book  by Judy Sierra.
Patterns can be found on page 97 of Sierra’s Pattern eBook.

This is a great story about a woodcutter who is granted three wishes, and the way he and his wife foolishly use them.  It’s a good one to use to spark discussion.

MOVEMENT: Aroostacha*

BOOK:
AnansesFeastbyMollel
Ananse’s Feast: An Ashanti Tale retold by Tololwa M. Mollel

VIDEO:
StregaNonaDVD
“Strega Nona” from Strega Nona …and More Stories About Magic

OTHER MATERIALS TO USE:
MrsChickenandtheHungryCrocodile SausagesbySouhami FatCatbyMacDonaldPancakesforSupperbyIsaacs GatorGumbobyFleming

Mrs. Chicken and the Hungry Crocodile
 by Won-Ldy Paye (one of my favorite folktales, but I read it to them last year)
Sausages by Jessica Souhami (This is a book version of The Three Wishes)
Fat Cat: A Danish Folktale by Margaret Read MacDonald
Pancakes for Supper by Anne Isaacs
Gator Gumbo by Candace Fleming

HOW IT WENT:
Pretty well!  This third grade class is really wonderful, and always such fun to read stories to, mostly because the teacher is really involved with her class and you can see she enjoys it as well.  I think, since Love and Roast Chicken is so long, I might have done another movement, then the flannelboard, then Aroostacha, and then the movie. 

ATTENDANCE: 21 people

*To see the words to these movements and activities I use frequently, please visit my A-capella Movements Section on my Storytime Movements and Music Page